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If you’re a stepparent, you may think of “self care” as a foreign concept. One stepmom said, “I feel like a person whose appointment book is always facing out for other people to write in!” Not a lot different from being a parent, but many stepparents have the responsibilities of parents PLUS. That’s why self care is so important. Here are some ideas: 1. Find a trusted someone to talk to. Sometimes it’s awkward complaining to your partner who may feel divided loyalties, depending on who’s in the family. A professional who understands stepparenting pressures can be a great help. 2....
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Posted by on in Diabetes Education
The Summer, 2015 issue of Scientific American magazine has an engaging article called, “The Birth of the Modern Diet.”  In it, the author, Rachel Laudan, tells us how opinions about food have changed over the centuries based on what scientists believe about the human body. In 1547, Andrew Boorde said, “A good coke is halfe a physysyon.”  Translated, it means that a good doctor would be a good cook and able to translate dietary theory into dishes for the King.  That theory dated back to Hippocrates in 400 B.C.  The body was believed to be comprised of four fluids or humors: ...
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Posted by on in In the Community
As I participate in a training exercise related to securing and maintaining the trust of others, I am reminded of the high value of integrity.  Webster defines Integrity as “the quality of being honest and fair.”  How does this apply to me? Many people view integrity as something that was developed long before we entered the workforce, something greatly influenced by how we were raised, by what experiences we had when we were young, and by our internal beliefs and faith systems.  Others feel integrity is something that is displayed by those following rules or those consistently being compliant to stated...
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Posted by on in At Home
Elderly people and individuals with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk of developing heat related illness.  Air-conditioning is the number one protective factor against heat related illness and death. Did you know that homebound persons without air conditioning are at an even greater risk for developing symptoms of heat stroke? If you have an elderly or medically compromised family member, friend, or neighbor, check on them twice each day to make sure they are staying cool and drinking adequate fluids.  Here are a few practical tips to keep in mind. Preventative measures to avoid health issues in hot weather: ·        ...
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B. J. Fogg, PhD, a Stanford expert in behavioral change, developed the “Tiny Habit” method of changing behavior.  He has dedicated two decades of research to helping people make changes that “stick.”  He is well aware that big goals tend to fail, and many of us give up after feeling like failures.  His research has showed that our ability to make changes depends on: ·         Motivation ·         Ability ·         Stimulus (Triggers) Here is an example that demonstrates this.  We are (most of us) motivated and able to get out of bed in the morning.  Having an alarm set to go off...
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Posted by on in Primary Care Clinic
Over the past five years, our membership-based Primary Care Clinic has been dedicated to providing exceptional healthcare to all of the members.  When we first opened the clinic, it was our goal to make primary healthcare more accessible and affordable to everyone who lives in our community.  Growing the clinic was an incredible experience and it gave us the opportunity to look at the traditional healthcare model in a completely different way and it was gratifying that many benefited from this unusual structure. A few months ago our Primary Care Clinic provider made the decision to move into a specialty practice....
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There are two very distinct groups that contact Occupational Health about this topic, and surprisingly both ask the very same question.  Whether it is an employer or a prospective employee, a common question comes up:  “What does this mean for me?”  It seems that each group is preparing for considerable changes in the way companies will address the upcoming July 1st marijuana legalization.  The fact of the matter is Measure 91 did not contain any language that requires an employer to allow marijuana use, nor does it provide protection of employment for an employee who chooses to use this substance.  Current...
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Posted by on in In the Community
Change is not easy and is a challenge to us all. However, we cannot forget that change is a constant and the better we are able to embrace change the better we can manage our feelings of change. I love this quote – “Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise so I am changing myself. ” – Rumi (13th century poet and theologian) Many people refer to these past years as an unprecedented time of change in the world of healthcare. In Lane County we have seen some amazing changes to the healthcare...
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What is Conflict? Conflict generally occurs when people find themselves in the midst of opposition.  This may begin with disagreements or when differences are emphasized.  Misunderstandings and stubbornness also often come into play.  Unchecked, conflict can trigger stress, frustration, hostility, withdrawal, blaming, fear, mistrust, disappointment, defensiveness, resentment, and even retaliation.  When managed productively, conflict can lead to stronger relationships, personal growth, understanding, and increased respect.  After all, who really enjoys being angry all of the time?  Your overall state of feeling and sense of well-being may improve as well. What Makes Conflict Worse? •In times of conflict, it may not be...
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Tips for Sprain and Strain Management   What is the difference between a sprain and a strain? Some believe that it's two terms describing the same thing, but that's not exactly it. A sprain is a tear in the ligament, and is common in the ankle, knee, wrist, thumb, or shoulder. A strain occurs when a muscle or tendon becomes overstretched, and is common in the groin, hamstring, back, or calf.   Though the injuries are different, the treatments are not. An easy way to remember how to treat these soft tissue injuries in the first 48 hours is the RICE...
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